• Ship Breaking by Demolition Shear

    Le Telegramme report on a ship breaking project - the demolition shear was manufactured by Zato. Engineering Services (London) Ltd. are proud to announce that we are the new UK and Ireland agents for the Zato range of recycling equipment. Cayman Demolition Shears are now available to order from Engineering Services (London) Ltd. For more information please contact us by telephone on 01656 747720 or by email at engineeringserviceslondon@yahoo.co.uk. http://www.engineeringserviceslondon.co.uk/newstock.htm

    published: 14 Sep 2012
  • Echoes of Ship Breaking

    The bothering heat and shouts of his Mukadam mingles with the echoes of machine and men usually 30 to 70 feet below him. He has to silence it all when he turns on his blow torch and focuses solely on weakening the structure of the very ship he stands on; right now he is working on the metal holdings around the mast. He stands away cautiously as the weakened mast is hooked on to a whinge and it's pulled down. The bulking mast hits the bottom of the hull, the boom reaches his ears and touches his skin, it reminds him a little bit of his village, of his childhood, when he would drop a metal bucket in well to collect water. With no time for nostalgia he gets back to cutting another part of the hull, he does this every day for 8-10 hours; his safety net is his experience. He is one of the 66,00...

    published: 17 Jul 2014
  • The Ship Breakers of Bangladesh: VICE INTL

    There aren't too many places left in the world where the practice of ship breaking—scrapping old ships for metal—can still exist. These days, environmental and labor regulations in the developed world have displaced the practice to India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, where cargo carriers are salvaged for their steel. The largest vessels wind up on the shores of the city of Chittagong in Bangladesh, where the industry has become a vital part of the country's urbanization. It employs roughly 200,000 workers and supplies the country with 80 percent of its steel. Ship breakers beach and dismantle vessels daily wearing flip­-flops and T-shirts. It's no easy task, considering ships are constructed to withstand the elements for the 30 years they spend operating on international waters. We decided t...

    published: 09 Feb 2015
  • Final destination: Ferry crashes into ship-breaking yard in Turkey

    Courtesy Salim San. The moment of a cross-channel ferry's seafaring days came to a grinding halt. The ship sailed between Dover and Calais for 22 years. What is in the news today? Click to watch: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSyY1udCyYqBeLGPTLVZMp8kczDH7_5Ni euronews: the most watched news channel in Europe Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronews euronews is available in 14 languages: https://www.youtube.com/user/euronewsnetwork/channels In English: Website: http://www.euronews.com/news Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/euronews Twitter: http://twitter.com/euronews Google+: http://google.com/+euronews VKontakte: http://vk.com/en.euronews

    published: 29 Jan 2014
  • The Dark side of the Shipping Industry - Ship Breakers

    In a nut shell, 'ship breaking' is where large numbers of used ships are sent to developing countries like China, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Turkey, they are systematically broken down by the cheap labor hired by these ship breakers. Workers are not trained, they are not supplied PPE and they get paid about $1 per day to work 12 hours every day, 7 days a week. Also see images from the Global Logistics Media Image Page : http://www.globallogisticsmedia.com/articles/view/take-a-glimpse-into-the-dark-side-of-the-shipping-industry---ship-breakers Video Courtesy of Vega Productions

    published: 17 Apr 2013
  • Wooden Boat Scrap at the Boatbreakers Scrapyard (Portsmouth, UK)

    This 1955 6 ton Hillyard wooden yacht was delivered from Brighton Marina to our yard and our team of Boat breakers quickly set about crunching her up with our heavy machinery. In total the length of time taken to scrap was 6 minutes. Boatbreakers are leading the way in the UK for responsible boat disposal. Any materials on the boat that can be recycled and re-used will be.

    published: 18 Mar 2016
  • Scrapped: Chittagong Cutters (RT Documentary)

    Bangladesh has no metal resources of its own city, so the shipbreaking yards in Chittagong, its largest second city, generate high profits for their owners. Workers though, enjoy none of the benefits of that profit; wages are barely enough to live on and there are no health and safety regulations to protect them. Injuries are a frequent occurrence and even death is not uncommon. RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RussiaToday Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com Follow us on Instagram http://instagram.com/rt Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT Listen to us on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/rttv RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting...

    published: 16 Mar 2015
  • Fedra breaks in two in heavy seas

    The vessel broke in two on Friday evening on the rocks at Europa Point, Gibraltar

    published: 11 Oct 2008
  • Ship Breaking in Bangladesh

    Film about ship breaking in Bangladesh and the conditions workers endure

    published: 08 Dec 2009
  • Supertanker FRONT DRIVER beaching itself at Gadani Pakistan.

    Supertanker named FRONT DRIVER, built in 1991 by Hyundai Heavy Industries South Korea (and owned by Frontline Management of Norway) - Now at the end of it's service life comes to Gadani beach of Pakistan, for decommissioning and breaking. All the steel (almost 90,000 tons of it) will now get recycled, and used within Pakistan. This video shows how a giant ship such as this arrived at Gadani beach (on November 28th 2012), and how got broken up. Special thanks to Mr. Dewan Rizwan Farooqui (Chairman of Pakistan Ship Breaker's Association) - For allowing me to gather all this video footage, as well as being an amazing host.

    published: 23 Jan 2013
  • Merchant vessel splits in two off Yemeni coast

    A container ship travelling to Saudi Arabia from Singapore sank off the coast of Yemen on Monday after suffering extensive damage. The container vessel was carrying 4,500 containers to Jeddah from Singapore. Making its way across the Indian Ocean amid bad weather the MOL Comfort suffered a crack and started taking on water causing the vessel's hull to split in half about 370 kilometers off the coast of Yemen. The crew escaped the sinking ship on life rafts and a life boat. The heavily damaged ship sank shortly afterward, causing an as yet undetermined amount of oil to be spilled into the ocean. All of the vessel's crew, mostly Russian and Filipino nationals, were rescued by Indian coast guards. -------------------------------------------------------- TomoNews is your daily source for to...

    published: 19 Jul 2013
  • India: See India's first aircraft carrier turned to scrap

    Video ID: 20141121-029 W/S Crane near INS Vikrant W/S INS Vikrant W/S Workers on deck of INS Vikrant W/S INS Vikrant W/S Workers on deck of INS Vikrant W/S INS Vikrant W/S Crane near INS Vikrant W/S INS Vikrant W/S Scrap near INS Vikrant W/S Moving scrap near INS Vikrant W/S Crane near INS Vikrant W/S Moving scrap near INS Vikrant W/S Crane near INS Vikrant M/S Scrap W/S Workers and scrap SCRIPT India's first aircraft carrier and one of the Indian Navy's most famous vessels, the INS Vikrant, was brought to the Powder Bunder ship-breaking yard in Mumbai on Friday to be dismantled. It will take 200 workers seven to eight months to dismantle the carrier, which is 213 metres (699 feet) in length and weighs 15,700 tonnes. The INS Vikrant's construction began under the name HMS Hercules for ...

    published: 21 Nov 2014
  • Scrap Tours- RMS WINDSOR CASTLE at the Ship Breakers.

    Rare footage of Alang Beach, the Worlds largest Scrapyard and in particular RMS Windsor Castle of Union Castle Line, beached and being dismantled. Courtesy of trinitymarine.co.uk

    published: 11 Dec 2007
  • World's biggest ship breaking yard

    Ship breaking is one of the most hazardous jobs in the world because most ships are used to carry radioactive materials, toxic wastes, extremely poisonous chemicals and oil. Not only does it directly affect the health of the workers, it is an environmental time bomb - as workers strip the ships marooned on the sea shore, there is severe contamination of the sea bed, eventually seeping into the marine food chain. We visit the world's biggest ship breaking yard, Alang.

    published: 08 Mar 2011
  • ☘ A Ship In Shipyard ☘

    ☘ A Ship In Shipyard ☘ ---------------------------------------- Shipyards and dockyards are places where ships are repaired and built. These can be yachts, military vessels, cruise liners or other cargo or passenger ships. Dockyards are sometimes more associated with maintenance and basing activities than shipyards, which are sometimes associated more with initial construction. The terms are routinely used interchangeably, in part because the evolution of dockyards and shipyards has often caused them to change or merge roles. Countries with large shipbuilding industries include Singapore, South Korea, Australia, Japan, China, Germany, Romania, Turkey, Poland and Croatia. The shipbuilding industry tends to be more fragmented in Europe than in Asia. In European countries there are a ...

    published: 25 Jun 2016
  • Belleek wood & Creteboom Concrete Boat Baliina

    A derelict tugboat, now at Ballina quay, is a reminder of a programme of concrete shipbuilding initiated in response to a serious shortage of steel in Britain during W.W.1. The vessel known as the Creteboom (pictured above), is one of 12 similar ferro-concrete tugboats built specifically to tow barges loaded with iron-ore from northern Spain to the foundries in Britain. However, before the completion of the fleet, hostilities had ended, and the vessels never fulfilled the role for which they were intended. In fact, the Creteboom’s launch was delayed until November 1919; one year after the war was over. In 1922, Stelp & Leighton, a firm of London based ship owners, bought the fleet from the government, and used them to tow barges laden with coal to Continental destinations. The Creteboom s...

    published: 20 Aug 2015
Ship Breaking by Demolition Shear

Ship Breaking by Demolition Shear

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:12
  • Updated: 14 Sep 2012
  • views: 352749
videos
Le Telegramme report on a ship breaking project - the demolition shear was manufactured by Zato. Engineering Services (London) Ltd. are proud to announce that we are the new UK and Ireland agents for the Zato range of recycling equipment. Cayman Demolition Shears are now available to order from Engineering Services (London) Ltd. For more information please contact us by telephone on 01656 747720 or by email at engineeringserviceslondon@yahoo.co.uk. http://www.engineeringserviceslondon.co.uk/newstock.htm
https://wn.com/Ship_Breaking_By_Demolition_Shear
Echoes of Ship Breaking

Echoes of Ship Breaking

  • Order:
  • Duration: 36:58
  • Updated: 17 Jul 2014
  • views: 246711
videos
The bothering heat and shouts of his Mukadam mingles with the echoes of machine and men usually 30 to 70 feet below him. He has to silence it all when he turns on his blow torch and focuses solely on weakening the structure of the very ship he stands on; right now he is working on the metal holdings around the mast. He stands away cautiously as the weakened mast is hooked on to a whinge and it's pulled down. The bulking mast hits the bottom of the hull, the boom reaches his ears and touches his skin, it reminds him a little bit of his village, of his childhood, when he would drop a metal bucket in well to collect water. With no time for nostalgia he gets back to cutting another part of the hull, he does this every day for 8-10 hours; his safety net is his experience. He is one of the 66,000 workers who work on the ship breaking yards at Alang in Gujarat and Darukhana in Mumbai. They migrate from UP, Orissa, Bihar and various other states across India in search of employment and better life. The job of these workers is to strip the raw materials from these ships and sell them to various integral industries i.e. construction, steel mills, to name a few. The ship breaking industry as always been surrounded with myths and controversies. With many reports in the media mostly giving it a broad tag of "hazardous to environment" which is far from the truth, what ship-breaking actually does is reuse valuable raw materials striped from a dead ship, which would end up being more hazardous if left in the sea. The primary pressing issue of ship breaking which gets skirted is its workers. The process of ship-breaking requires workers from the start to the end. Often to skirt costs; untrained contractual workers will be hired, safety equipment will be ignored and benefits will be skimmed. In this documentary 'Echoes of Ship-Breaking' we'll be entering through the backdoor of the ship-breaking industry to see: • How the industry processes labour and ships • How ships are brought in and labourers are hired, and how it starts • The industry's questionable history regarding worker laws • Why and how ship breaking reached India • How ship breaking affects the environment • Breaking down the process of ship-breaking in India • Its contribution to India and the future of ship breaking in India
https://wn.com/Echoes_Of_Ship_Breaking
The Ship Breakers of Bangladesh: VICE INTL

The Ship Breakers of Bangladesh: VICE INTL

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:15
  • Updated: 09 Feb 2015
  • views: 408326
videos
There aren't too many places left in the world where the practice of ship breaking—scrapping old ships for metal—can still exist. These days, environmental and labor regulations in the developed world have displaced the practice to India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, where cargo carriers are salvaged for their steel. The largest vessels wind up on the shores of the city of Chittagong in Bangladesh, where the industry has become a vital part of the country's urbanization. It employs roughly 200,000 workers and supplies the country with 80 percent of its steel. Ship breakers beach and dismantle vessels daily wearing flip­-flops and T-shirts. It's no easy task, considering ships are constructed to withstand the elements for the 30 years they spend operating on international waters. We decided to check it out. Click here to subscribe to VICE: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://bit.ly/VICE-Videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our Tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/vice
https://wn.com/The_Ship_Breakers_Of_Bangladesh_Vice_Intl
Final destination: Ferry crashes into ship-breaking yard in Turkey

Final destination: Ferry crashes into ship-breaking yard in Turkey

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:02
  • Updated: 29 Jan 2014
  • views: 1306919
videos
Courtesy Salim San. The moment of a cross-channel ferry's seafaring days came to a grinding halt. The ship sailed between Dover and Calais for 22 years. What is in the news today? Click to watch: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSyY1udCyYqBeLGPTLVZMp8kczDH7_5Ni euronews: the most watched news channel in Europe Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronews euronews is available in 14 languages: https://www.youtube.com/user/euronewsnetwork/channels In English: Website: http://www.euronews.com/news Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/euronews Twitter: http://twitter.com/euronews Google+: http://google.com/+euronews VKontakte: http://vk.com/en.euronews
https://wn.com/Final_Destination_Ferry_Crashes_Into_Ship_Breaking_Yard_In_Turkey
The Dark side of the Shipping Industry - Ship Breakers

The Dark side of the Shipping Industry - Ship Breakers

  • Order:
  • Duration: 22:05
  • Updated: 17 Apr 2013
  • views: 83692
videos
In a nut shell, 'ship breaking' is where large numbers of used ships are sent to developing countries like China, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Turkey, they are systematically broken down by the cheap labor hired by these ship breakers. Workers are not trained, they are not supplied PPE and they get paid about $1 per day to work 12 hours every day, 7 days a week. Also see images from the Global Logistics Media Image Page : http://www.globallogisticsmedia.com/articles/view/take-a-glimpse-into-the-dark-side-of-the-shipping-industry---ship-breakers Video Courtesy of Vega Productions
https://wn.com/The_Dark_Side_Of_The_Shipping_Industry_Ship_Breakers
Wooden Boat Scrap at the Boatbreakers Scrapyard (Portsmouth, UK)

Wooden Boat Scrap at the Boatbreakers Scrapyard (Portsmouth, UK)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:39
  • Updated: 18 Mar 2016
  • views: 1115
videos
This 1955 6 ton Hillyard wooden yacht was delivered from Brighton Marina to our yard and our team of Boat breakers quickly set about crunching her up with our heavy machinery. In total the length of time taken to scrap was 6 minutes. Boatbreakers are leading the way in the UK for responsible boat disposal. Any materials on the boat that can be recycled and re-used will be.
https://wn.com/Wooden_Boat_Scrap_At_The_Boatbreakers_Scrapyard_(Portsmouth,_Uk)
Scrapped: Chittagong Cutters (RT Documentary)

Scrapped: Chittagong Cutters (RT Documentary)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 26:13
  • Updated: 16 Mar 2015
  • views: 23154
videos
Bangladesh has no metal resources of its own city, so the shipbreaking yards in Chittagong, its largest second city, generate high profits for their owners. Workers though, enjoy none of the benefits of that profit; wages are barely enough to live on and there are no health and safety regulations to protect them. Injuries are a frequent occurrence and even death is not uncommon. RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RussiaToday Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com Follow us on Instagram http://instagram.com/rt Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT Listen to us on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/rttv RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 1 billion YouTube views benchmark.
https://wn.com/Scrapped_Chittagong_Cutters_(Rt_Documentary)
Fedra breaks in two in heavy seas

Fedra breaks in two in heavy seas

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:01
  • Updated: 11 Oct 2008
  • views: 582608
videos
The vessel broke in two on Friday evening on the rocks at Europa Point, Gibraltar
https://wn.com/Fedra_Breaks_In_Two_In_Heavy_Seas
Ship Breaking in Bangladesh

Ship Breaking in Bangladesh

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:26
  • Updated: 08 Dec 2009
  • views: 43430
videos
Film about ship breaking in Bangladesh and the conditions workers endure
https://wn.com/Ship_Breaking_In_Bangladesh
Supertanker FRONT DRIVER beaching itself at Gadani Pakistan.

Supertanker FRONT DRIVER beaching itself at Gadani Pakistan.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 20:42
  • Updated: 23 Jan 2013
  • views: 1042621
videos
Supertanker named FRONT DRIVER, built in 1991 by Hyundai Heavy Industries South Korea (and owned by Frontline Management of Norway) - Now at the end of it's service life comes to Gadani beach of Pakistan, for decommissioning and breaking. All the steel (almost 90,000 tons of it) will now get recycled, and used within Pakistan. This video shows how a giant ship such as this arrived at Gadani beach (on November 28th 2012), and how got broken up. Special thanks to Mr. Dewan Rizwan Farooqui (Chairman of Pakistan Ship Breaker's Association) - For allowing me to gather all this video footage, as well as being an amazing host.
https://wn.com/Supertanker_Front_Driver_Beaching_Itself_At_Gadani_Pakistan.
Merchant vessel splits in two off Yemeni coast

Merchant vessel splits in two off Yemeni coast

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:50
  • Updated: 19 Jul 2013
  • views: 1840582
videos
A container ship travelling to Saudi Arabia from Singapore sank off the coast of Yemen on Monday after suffering extensive damage. The container vessel was carrying 4,500 containers to Jeddah from Singapore. Making its way across the Indian Ocean amid bad weather the MOL Comfort suffered a crack and started taking on water causing the vessel's hull to split in half about 370 kilometers off the coast of Yemen. The crew escaped the sinking ship on life rafts and a life boat. The heavily damaged ship sank shortly afterward, causing an as yet undetermined amount of oil to be spilled into the ocean. All of the vessel's crew, mostly Russian and Filipino nationals, were rescued by Indian coast guards. -------------------------------------------------------- TomoNews is your daily source for top animated news. We've combined animation and video footage with a snarky personality to bring you the biggest and best stories from around the world. For news that's fun and never boring, visit our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TomoNewsUS Subscribe to stay updated on all the top stories: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=TomoNewsUS Stay connected with us here: Facebook http://www.facebook.com/TomoNewsUS Twitter @tomonewsus http://www.twitter.com/TomoNewsUS Google+ http://gplus.to/TomoNewsUS
https://wn.com/Merchant_Vessel_Splits_In_Two_Off_Yemeni_Coast
India: See India's first aircraft carrier turned to scrap

India: See India's first aircraft carrier turned to scrap

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:04
  • Updated: 21 Nov 2014
  • views: 14450
videos
Video ID: 20141121-029 W/S Crane near INS Vikrant W/S INS Vikrant W/S Workers on deck of INS Vikrant W/S INS Vikrant W/S Workers on deck of INS Vikrant W/S INS Vikrant W/S Crane near INS Vikrant W/S INS Vikrant W/S Scrap near INS Vikrant W/S Moving scrap near INS Vikrant W/S Crane near INS Vikrant W/S Moving scrap near INS Vikrant W/S Crane near INS Vikrant M/S Scrap W/S Workers and scrap SCRIPT India's first aircraft carrier and one of the Indian Navy's most famous vessels, the INS Vikrant, was brought to the Powder Bunder ship-breaking yard in Mumbai on Friday to be dismantled. It will take 200 workers seven to eight months to dismantle the carrier, which is 213 metres (699 feet) in length and weighs 15,700 tonnes. The INS Vikrant's construction began under the name HMS Hercules for the British Royal Navy during World War II, but never entered service. India purchased the incomplete carrier in 1957, completed construction and deployed the vessel among others in the 1971 Indo-Pakistan War, where it played a key role in the naval blockade of what was then East Pakistan (present-day Bangladesh). Between 1997 to 2012, the Vikrant was preserved as a museum ship in Mumbai until being withdrawn in 2012 due to safety concerns. Mumbai-based IB Commercials Ltd bought the Vikrant in an online auction in January, and has since made preparations for its dismantlement. Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Ruptly Twitter: http://twitter.com/Ruptly LiveLeak: http://www.liveleak.com/c/Ruptly Google Plus: http://google.com/+RuptlyTV Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/Ruptly YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/RuptlyTV DailyMotion: http://www.dailymotion.com/ruptly Video on Demand: http://www.ruptly.tv
https://wn.com/India_See_India's_First_Aircraft_Carrier_Turned_To_Scrap
Scrap Tours- RMS WINDSOR CASTLE at the Ship Breakers.

Scrap Tours- RMS WINDSOR CASTLE at the Ship Breakers.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:02
  • Updated: 11 Dec 2007
  • views: 78100
videos
Rare footage of Alang Beach, the Worlds largest Scrapyard and in particular RMS Windsor Castle of Union Castle Line, beached and being dismantled. Courtesy of trinitymarine.co.uk
https://wn.com/Scrap_Tours_Rms_Windsor_Castle_At_The_Ship_Breakers.
World's biggest ship breaking yard

World's biggest ship breaking yard

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:34
  • Updated: 08 Mar 2011
  • views: 408402
videos
Ship breaking is one of the most hazardous jobs in the world because most ships are used to carry radioactive materials, toxic wastes, extremely poisonous chemicals and oil. Not only does it directly affect the health of the workers, it is an environmental time bomb - as workers strip the ships marooned on the sea shore, there is severe contamination of the sea bed, eventually seeping into the marine food chain. We visit the world's biggest ship breaking yard, Alang.
https://wn.com/World's_Biggest_Ship_Breaking_Yard
☘   A Ship In Shipyard    ☘

☘ A Ship In Shipyard ☘

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:49
  • Updated: 25 Jun 2016
  • views: 363
videos
☘ A Ship In Shipyard ☘ ---------------------------------------- Shipyards and dockyards are places where ships are repaired and built. These can be yachts, military vessels, cruise liners or other cargo or passenger ships. Dockyards are sometimes more associated with maintenance and basing activities than shipyards, which are sometimes associated more with initial construction. The terms are routinely used interchangeably, in part because the evolution of dockyards and shipyards has often caused them to change or merge roles. Countries with large shipbuilding industries include Singapore, South Korea, Australia, Japan, China, Germany, Romania, Turkey, Poland and Croatia. The shipbuilding industry tends to be more fragmented in Europe than in Asia. In European countries there are a greater number of small companies, compared to the fewer, larger companies in the shipbuilding countries of Asia. Most shipbuilders in the United States are privately owned, the largest being Huntington Ingalls Industries, a multibillion-dollar defense contractor, and the oldest family owned shipyard being Colonna's Shipyard in Norfolk, VA. The publicly owned shipyards in the US are Naval facilities providing basing, support and repair. Shipyards are constructed nearby the sea or tidal rivers to allow easy access for their ships. In the United Kingdom, for example, shipyards were established on the River Thames (King Henry VIII founded yards at Woolwich and Deptford in 1512 and 1513 respectively), River Mersey, River Tees, River Tyne, River Wear and River Clyde – the latter growing to be the World's pre-eminent shipbuilding centre. Sir Alfred Yarrow established his yard by the Thames in London's Docklands in the late 19th century before moving it northwards to the banks of the Clyde at Scotstoun (1906–08). Other famous UK shipyards include the Harland and Wolff yard in Belfast, Northern Ireland, where Titanic was built, and the naval dockyard at Chatham, England on the Medway in north Kent. The site of a large shipyard will contain many specialised cranes, dry docks, slipways, dust-free warehouses, painting facilities and extremely large areas for fabrication of the ships. After a ship's useful life is over, it makes its final voyage to a shipbreaking yard, often on a beach in South Asia. Historically shipbreaking was carried on in drydock in developed countries, but high wages and environmental regulations have resulted in movement of the industry to developing regions. The world's earliest known dockyards were built in the Harappan port city of Lothal circa 2600 BC in Gujarat, India. Lothal's dockyards connected to an ancient course of the Sabarmati river on the trade route between Harappan cities in Sindh and the peninsula of Saurashtra when the surrounding Kutch desert was a part of the Arabian Sea. Lothal engineers accorded high priority to the creation of a dockyard and a warehouse to serve the purposes of naval trade. The dock was built on the eastern flank of the town, and is regarded by archaeologists as an engineering feat of the highest order. It was located away from the main current of the river to avoid silting, but provided access to ships in high tide as well. The name of the ancient Greek city of Naupactus means "shipyard" (combination of the Greek words ναύς naus ship, boat and πήγνυμι pêgnumi, pegnymi builder, fixer). Naupactus' reputation in this field extends to the time of legend, where it is depicted as the place where the Heraclidae built a fleet to invade the Peloponnesus. In the Spanish city of Barcelona, the Drassanes shipyards were active from at least the mid-13th century until the 18th century, although it at times served as a barracks for troops as well as an arsenal. During its time of operation it was continuously changed, rebuilt and modified, but two original towers and part of the original eight construction naves remain today. It is currently a maritime museum. Ships were the first items to be manufactured in a factory, several hundred years before the Industrial Revolution, in the Venice Arsenal, Venice, Italy. The Arsenal apparently mass-produced nearly one ship every day using pre-manufactured parts, and assembly lines and, at its height, employed 16,000 people. Keyword: shipyard guide, shipyard documentary, shipyard accident, shipyard board game, shipyard wow, shipyard docker, shipyard game, shipyard brewing company, shipyards of lorient, shipyard, shipyard welding, shipyard crane, shipyard addon, shipyard safety animation, shipyard crane accident If you want to see this video again than visit the link below; https://youtu.be/aMagLxzqWwE Thanks
https://wn.com/☘_A_Ship_In_Shipyard_☘
Belleek wood & Creteboom Concrete Boat Baliina

Belleek wood & Creteboom Concrete Boat Baliina

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:15
  • Updated: 20 Aug 2015
  • views: 7674
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A derelict tugboat, now at Ballina quay, is a reminder of a programme of concrete shipbuilding initiated in response to a serious shortage of steel in Britain during W.W.1. The vessel known as the Creteboom (pictured above), is one of 12 similar ferro-concrete tugboats built specifically to tow barges loaded with iron-ore from northern Spain to the foundries in Britain. However, before the completion of the fleet, hostilities had ended, and the vessels never fulfilled the role for which they were intended. In fact, the Creteboom’s launch was delayed until November 1919; one year after the war was over. In 1922, Stelp & Leighton, a firm of London based ship owners, bought the fleet from the government, and used them to tow barges laden with coal to Continental destinations. The Creteboom spent a lot of her time in the Baltic, and visited the port of Petrograd on several occasions. In 1924, rising costs, port charges etc., made the operation uneconomic and the Concrete Shipping Co. was forced to cease trading. For several years afterwards, the fleet was ’moth-balled’ on the river Wear, and were eventually disposed of. In 1935, the Creteboom, still in very good condition, was bought by the South Stockton Shipbreaking Co. of Thornaby on Tees, and stripped of all her metal parts. Later, in 1937, the hulk was sold on to the Ballina Harbour Commissioners, who had her towed to the river Moy. The Commissioner’s plan was to use her as a sand-stop, but the Moy Fishery Co. threatened legal action, fearing the plan would interfere with the run of salmon into the river. This complication, and the eventual outbreak of W.W.2, caused the work to be abandoned. The hulk, having been there since Sept., 22nd 1937, is now a familiar sight on the river, and a constant source of wonder to visitors. Some technical details. Engine; A three cylinder, 725 I.H.P steam driven engine. Boilers: Two Scotch marine boilers, 11 ft. long, and 9ft. 6 ins. in diameter provided 180-p.s.i. pressure. Fuel: Two coalbunkers placed one on each side of the engine had a total capacity of 80 tons. Length: 125 ft. Breadth: 27 ft. 6 ins. Draught: 13 ft. 4 ins.
https://wn.com/Belleek_Wood_Creteboom_Concrete_Boat_Baliina
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